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Coat of Arms of Washingtonia
Breaking the Poverty Cycle Act
Grand Washingtonian Assembly
Territorial extent Kingdom of Washingtonia
Status: In force
The Breaking the Poverty Cycle Act of 2013 is a controversial Act of the Grand Assembly in the Kingdom of Washingtonia which is officially aimed[1] at reducing the generational cycle of poverty. Notably, it disallows persons who earn half less income than the national average to procreate. These provisions have been widely attacked and alleged to be inconsistent with the Constitution of 1913.[2] Most commentators however do not believe the courts will declare it unconstitutional because of precedent set by the case of Harcourt vs. The Throne, in which the Adoption Act of 1996 was challenged, and passed.[3][4]

Overview

The Breaking the Poverty Cycle Bill was first introduced to the Grand Assembly on the 27 of January 2013 and read by the author, Assemblyman Timothy M. Winters of the ruling Union Nationalist Party. During committee stage, the Christian Libertarian caucus staged a symbolic walkout (which is done often) to protest what Leader of the Opposition Joseph Evans called "another affront to liberty and the people of Washingtonia". The Bill became controversial in the media with many legal scholars and commentators immediately decrying it as oppressive legislation and contrary to the Constitution. Many, however, expressed support[5] for the Bill, describing it as a "useful tool in limiting the spread of poverty from already existing paupers to children which they simply cannot care for."

The Bill passed on the Assembly floor on 4 June 2013 despite the entire opposition caucus voting in opposition to it. Strict party discipline was enforced, therefore no UNP assemblymen voted against the Bill. The Bill became an Act on 11 June when the President assented to it.

Notable provisions

  • Section 2(1)(a): If a female without a permanent partner, spouse or capable provider, earns less than half of the national average in income, she may not procreate, or adopt a child, or take a child into her care.
  • Section 2(1)(f): The Minister of the Interior may provide permission, and therefore exempt, a female from the provisions (a)-(e) above.
  • Section 2(2)(a): If a male without a permanent partner, spouse or capable provider, earns less than half of the national average in income, he may not adopt a child, or take a child into his care.
  • Section 2(2)(d): The Minister of the Interior may provide permission, and therefore exempt, a male from the provisions (a)-(c) above.

See also

References

  1. "Breaking the Poverty Cycle Bill (GWA)." Assembly Record 191 (27 January 2013) GWA211. Accessed: 17/10/14.
  2. Parks, Bryan. (2013). Washingtonia's Poor Family Policy: A Legal Analysis. DULS Law Review, Vol 3, 57-88.
  3. Botone, Jean. (2013). The Harcourt Judgment: Barrier to Breaking the Breaking the Poverty Cycle Act. DULS Law Review, Vol 3, 89-96..
  4. Carmichele, Eric. (2013). The Breaking the Poverty Cycle Act is here to stay. Green Law Journal, Vol 2, 22-37..
  5. Bennett, TJ. (2013). The Poverty Cycle Law is definitely needed. DULS Law Review, Vol 1, 42-74.

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