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This is a list of Sierran words not widely used in the rest of Anglo-America, in the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Holland, New Zealand, and/or India. Some Sierran terms listed are used commonly however, in select countries.
  • Asterisks (*) denote words and meanings having appreciable (that is, not occasional) currency in select varieties of English, but nonetheless distinctive of Sierran English for their relatively greater frequency in Sierran speech and writing.
  • Sierran Hanzi terms in their isolated forms are not presented in this glossary. For Sierran Hanzi characters, see here.
  • Sierran spelling is consistently used throughout this article, except when explicitly referencing terms in other forms of English.

0–9

4-4 
(pronounced four fours) a curse; reference to the importance of the number "4" as unlucky in East Asian cultures because of its association with death
611 
(pronounced "six one one") the Sierran emergency telephone number
77 
a reference to the final year of the Sierran Civil War (1877), commonly used by Sierran republicans

A

aba 
an affection term to refer to one's father
ace 
(informal) a person with Savant syndrome or savant-like qualities
aegyo 
(1) a cute or attractive female (e.g. She's a nice aegyo.); (2) a cute or playful facial expression. Korean in origin.
advert 
a contraction of advertisement, similar to British English, but generally used to refer to malicious or solicitous material online
aiyah 
(alternatively spelled "ai yah" or "ay ya") a expression used to express shock, frustration, or dissatisfaction. Transliteration of the Chinese terms "哎呀" and "哎唷". Chinese in origin.
bo ta 
a traditional expression used when toasting (similar to cheers or bottoms up). Hokkien in origin.
amongst 
a synonym of among used interchangeably and more frequently in Sierran English compared to general Anglo-American English
anata 
(affectionate) a very kind, loving person (similar to dear). Japanese in origin.
algerine 
(informal) a stupid, disrespectful, or boorish person.
all-over
to be overwhelmed physically, emotionally, or mentally (e.g. "I felt all-over when I found out I had to work today.")
animal style 
thousand island dressing. Originated from the animal style spread from in-N-Out.
Arbees 
(affectionate) the RBS (Royal Broadcasting Service)
Arysian 
a portmanteau of "Aryan" and "Asian" which is synonymous for "Eurasians", but usually used (often mockingly) for proponents of Asian–Aryanism.
ao dai 
(pronounced as "ow yai"; alternatively spelled as ao yai or aoyai) a long dress worn by women. Vietnamese in origin.
arroyo 
a usually dry creek. Spanish in origin.
ascended 
intelligent, enlightened, or open-minded
(be) assed/asked 
(informal) to be made to care or do something, usually as a negative or a conditional (AA be bothered to, UK be arsed)
autoscript 
a pre-written statement or document used for academic or occupational purposes
avamarie 
a faux minced oath used to convey shock or frustration. Originates from the opener to the Catholic traditional prayer to Mary, mother of Jesus in Latin (Ave Maria).

B

bachup 
used similarly to "not giving a damn" (e.g. "the boss doesn't give bachup what his workers think"). Hokkien in origin.
bahonggong 
(colloquial) an annoying person, an idiot
baity 
(informal) suspicious, untrustworthy, unreliable (AA sketchy; UK dodgy)
bammy 
(informal) fried donut; plural form "bammys" or "bammies". Possibly Farsi in origin from Bāmiyeh (باميه).
bandy 
(1) a bandage for minor wounds; (2) an old and/or small car; (3) (informal) a corruption of brandy, an alcoholic drink
banger 
an energetic or exciting song, usually of dance music or hip hop
baronize 
to ennobled or to be bestowed with nobility, used to refer to the peerage system in Sierra; individuals who have been baronized are known as nobles or baroned
based 
cool or amazing, generally used to refer to people (e.g. "I'm so based")
bedroom town 
a commuter town or suburb (UK dormitory town; AA bedroom community)
beaucoup 
a lot, many. French in origin.
belting 
(slang) fighting (AA whipping)
bellows 
the lungs
(the) Big One 
a large, catastrophic earthquake or tsunami. The recent 2017 Pawnee earthquake has been commonly referred to as the most recent "Big One".
blinker 
the eye or eyelid
blood(y) moon(ed) 
serious, definitively sure (e.g. "I'm blood moon about winning tonight."); originates from 19th-century Anglo-American venacular
bonnie 
a young girl; a handsome fellow. Derives from Scottish English/Middle French.
bo ta 
a traditional expression used when toasting (similar to cheers or bottoms up). Hokkien in origin.
booby 
a lollipop or similar candy
bop 
to quickly glance or look at someone or something; in plural, breasts (vulgar slang e.g. "flash me your bops")
boujee 
(alternatively spelled bougee) middle class; originally a derogatory term derived from the French word and Marxist term bourgeoisie
bowed 
a gentlemen or virtuous individual (when pronounced as the past tense for bowing) or a well-mannered lady (when pronounced as "bow" in bow tie); can be used as an adjective (e.g. "We're looking for someone who is bowed.")
brazzie 
(informal) a term for a Brazorian or Brazorians
brine house/brinery 
a water or sewage treatment plant
brisk 
(informal) a walk or stroll, always used a noun (e.g. "to take a brisk")
(to) bull 
to lie or deceive. Derived from "bullshit"
bum 
(colloquial) To ask someone to give one (something) for free; to beg for something.
bunny 
(colloquial) an attractive, young person (either sex); one's crush (puppy love)
burrito bounce 
inflatable castle (AA bouncy house)
butter (boy/girl) 
(slang) a mildly derogatory term for white Sierrans who conform to the modern Sierran culture, which emerged from the Sierran Cultural Revolution. Often used jokingly but can and has been used negatively by white supremacists and cultural republicans.

C

cacaboo 
(affectionate) a jocular, lighthearted tease, usually directed towards small children (similar to rascal)
Cado 
(vulgar) a contraction of the fruit avocado used to refer to a Sierran; depending on the context, it could range from a term of endearment to a deep insult
canonical 
standard or widely accepted truth, often indisputable or common sense
canopy 
(1) A backyard space, usually a patio, covered by a balcony or extended roof; (2) a topping or layer of garnish placed atop dishes, especially rice. Latter term is French in origin from canapé
candy chip 
a tricolored candy that mimics the look of corn and is often sold during Halloween (AA/UK: candy corn)
car rest 
a rest area
car rub 
an oil spill or slick on the road that is hazardous to drivers and pedestrians
caroline 
a narrow, usually single-lane road
circade 
(informal) to study or work diligently all-night (e.g. "She circaded last night and fell asleep on the test!"), generally used by students who are cramming their exams or workers who are working overtime; originates from the word circadian
cha 
(informal) tea. Mandarin in origin from (chá)
chalker 
(informal) a teacher or professor
Chandler 
a purse or fashionable women's bag, the term comes from the Chandler brand, whose line of purses were genericized over time
chao 
porridge, more specifically, congee. Vietnamese in origin from the word cháo. Occasionally spelled as "chow" or "jow" depending on regional dialects.
chastity officer 
a paid government worker or member of law enforcement working for an agency; roughly equivalent to a probation officer
chevron marker 
an arrow or a sign used for directions (e.g. "Follow the chevron markers when driving near construction sites.")
chew
chewing gum or similarly textured confectionaries like gummy bears
chez(zy) 
(informal) home or living quarters (e.g. "If you want, you should come to over to my chez."). French in origin, derives from the word '"chez", meaning "at the home of..."
ch'i 
energy of an object or person. Mandarin in origin.
chicken squeeze 
(slang) to lose face, to act dishonorably, derives from the traditional rubber chicken "test" where military infantrymen, law enforcement officers, or other disciplined members must resist expressing emotion when hearing the toy horn
chibi 
an infant, toddler, or a small child. Japanese in origin.
chiggy/chiggies 
(informal) a rash; feeling very itchy; derived from the irritating chigger bites (e.g. "I got the chiggies all over, love.")
chorking 
a large housefly; Michigander English in origin
Cockade 
(informal) a neutral term used to refer to Sierran Jacobites. Derives from the traditional white cockade ribbons adorned by Jacobites in their traditional dress
cockrag 
(vulgar) a derogatory insult to refer to Jacobites and monarchists. Considered a vulgar version of Cockade or crow.
coiner 
cashier
comforter 
a reclinable, usually remote-controlled or manually adjustable chair made out of leather or similar material
COMPARS 
acronym for the Communist Party of Sierra
conserver 
a container or a cabinet; in some regions, also used to refer to the refrigerator
counterstore 
a pharmacy, or a convenience store that may or may not necessarily sell medicine (AA drugstore; UK corner store [approx.])
creech 
an isolated hill with irregular or rugged terrain (similar to butte)
cotton cloud 
spun sugar candy that is often colorful and sold at public events, especially with children (AA cotton candy; UK candy floss)
covfefe 
anything inconsequential or superficial
cruise (out) 
(informal) leave (e.g. "Let's cruise out of here")
crow 
(slang) a monarchist or a Royalist Party member, used dismissively or contemptuously by republicans
crownie/crowny 
(slang) see crow
cuh 
(slang) cousin; a comrade or friend
cult juicing 
(slang) brainwashing

D

dapper 
toilet paper
dashie 
a cigarette or cigar
deferred delivery 
poste restante or general delivery
dental mint 
a mint-flavored sweet, generally shaped like a squircle
Derp 
(slang) a disparaging term to refer to the Democratic-Republican Party of Sierra or its members, derives from the party acronym, DRPS
digestive 
a small snack or light beverage consumed just after a meal (similar but not the same as a dessert). Derives from the French term digestif. Unlike the French sense of the word, digestives are not typically alcoholic.
dim sum 
(1) generic term for brunch; (2) Chinese dim sum: a specialized brunch with food served in small baskets and tea at dim sum teahouses. Cantonese in origin from the Cantonese cuisine tradition.
dip 
to have sexual intercourse
dishwipe 
a cloth used for cleaning dishes
Doctor P's/Dr. P's 
(informal) an endearing term to refer to the Democratic-Republican Party of Sierra
Dorito face 
an expression one makes after making a sarcastic remark; in text it is expressed as ":^)"
Double Double
a hamburger with two patties. Derives from the In-N-Out Double Double item, which has since been genericized.
door grip 
door handle or doorknob
dossiery 
a building or room that stores important and/or personally sensitive documents or archives; roughly equivalent to a property rooms
down the river 
(slang) suicide; possible origins as reference to the death of Prime Minister Ulysses Perry, who was purported to have committed suicide by gunshot and fell into the San Joaquin River, and informal expression of cutting oneself's arms along the veins
drainer 
rain gutter or storm drain
DRPS 
acronym for the Democratic-Republican Party of Sierra
durplant 
houseplant

E

Earnest Ed 
(colloquial) "that's it", "there you go"
ecks dee 
phonetic spelling of "XD", an emoticon expression of laughter. Typically used to express ironic humor, especially inside jokes.
edged out 
(slang) tired, exhausted
eeya 
used to convey disgust, fear, or morbid curiosity
endgame 
(informal) (1) retirement plan; (2) future plans or goals; (3) a romantic relationship, usually a marriage
ensignman 
standard-bearer
enterpriser 
occupational supervisor, store manager
ermine 
furniture which features a decorative pattern usually featuring floral or geometric designs (e.g. "How much will you charge for the ermine [rug]?")

F

farmer coat 
overalls
federal 
an important document, usually issued or mandated by the government; short for federal statutory agreement
fence 
to close a business or service; closed (e.g. "The bank is fenced until 8 tomorrow morning.")
fetch mail 
priority mail, similar to first-class mail
field cadet 
a college or university student who is commissioned overseas during the summer between academic years
fiesta alley 
a strip mall
figuring studio 
employment search facility aimed at helping clients find long-term jobs
Fiji platter 
a food tray assorted with fruits (typically tropical) and/or vegetables
fingering 
acting suspiciously, plotting, schemeing
firefly 
Lampyrid insect, which is neither native nor currently present in much of Sierra itself; known as lightning bug in Anglo-America
firehound 
Dalmatian dog
flag inspector 
a person employed by the government who is certified with inspecting and ensuring buildings conform to safety regulations
flagging (down)* 
to catch someone's attention or to warn someone; (slang) to successfully land a sexual encounter with someone
flex 
brag, gloat, show off
flightling 
young child
flightling school 
Montessori school
flint 
(slang) kitchen stove
free timer 
an unemployed person who may or may not be actively searching for a job
French gear 
clothing made from furry animal hide
fromage 
cheese, usually in its packaged, unwrapped state (roughly equivalent to a wheel or brick of cheese). French in origin. Fromage bites is a derivative of this word and is used to refer to "cheese curds".
footsies 
an imaginary disease contrived by children (similar to cooties)
footsy shop 
nail salon
forested cost 
prepaid expenses or assets
fupa chair 
(informal) motorized wheelchair
futanari 
(vulgar slang) a transvestite; commonly shortened to futa. Japanese in origin

G

gallon 
(informal) a large bottle of water or drink irrespective of actual size
gellot 
(slang) (1) to overeat to the point where the thought of food is repulsive, (2) food too rich in taste it is unbearable
general command 
public service announcement
general commission 
membership fee
gentrywear 
formal clothing
gentrified trust 
(UK Quango)
ghetto bird 
(slang) a police helicopter
glenko 
(slang) bastard, traitor; derives from Sierran Jacobite folklore surrounding the Massacre of Glencoe
gloss(y) 
(colloquial) nail polish
glutton bar 
(colloquial) all-you-can eat buffet
greencap 
(informal) a republican
greenie 
(slang) a stronger, mocking variation of greencap
grip 
(slang) a lot of something

H

handover 
(colloquial) side dish; Sierran banchan
hank 
(slang) a police officer; used similar to "cop"
Hanzi
Chinese characters
herbal 
(slang) aphrodisiac
heka 
(colloquial) variant of hella
hella 
(colloquial) an intensifier that is a contraction of "hell of a" or "helluva"; a lot, a hell of a lot; to a large extent; totally; very much
hood 
(colloquial) umbrella
Hoon* 
(slang) a racial slur directed against people of Han descent from Hani. Not to be confused with the Han Chinese.
Hoosier juice 
(slang) Bourbon whiskey
Hoosier salad 
a popular topping of steamed sweet corn on various dishes, alternatively called Hoosier-style
hot pursuit 
(colloquial) breaking news, groundbreaking truth or new details; originates from frequently broadcasted car chases on Sierran national television
hot box
a rice dish sold in a styrofoam box as a take-out meal, includes varieties including the Salsi shawarma.
houndry 
animal shelter, dog pound
huskie 
a military infantryman

I

ice pick 
Ice pop
icetop 
black ice; dangerous, slippery road condition
idge 
contracted form of idiot, alternatively spelled as idj
Indian reserve 
Indian reservation
interest firm 
non-government organization
internal control 
damage control

J

Jacob 
(slang) a Sierran Jacobite
jalapeño 
hot rod; a flashy car
Jeb
(slang) a term referring to for socially inept, pathetic, or dull people; loser
jeebee 
(vulgar slang) vagina, cunt; can be used as an expletive. Hokkien in origin from jibai.
jimbo 
(vulgar slang) : the penis; a highly contemptible person (AA/UK dick)
jockey shack 
(slang) a fast food restaurant, usually one that sells mainly hamburgers (alternatively called jockey joint)
(by) Jove 
minced oath for "by Jehovah"
Judas' coins 
(slang) an expletive expression said out of frustration or anger; reference to Judas Iscariot's thirty pieces of silver
juke 
(colloquial) to avoid; to outmaneuver
jumped (on) 
(slang) beaten up, mugged
June Gloom 
(colloquial) A natural weather pattern that occurs in the Southwest Corridor when summer mornings feature low temperatures and cloudy skies; also known as Gray May, No Sky July, and Fogust, depending on the month.

K

keto 
(informal) meat; protein
kindercare 
child day care
kinky 
messy, unorganized, dirty
kirk 
(affectionately) church. Scottish in origin.
knob 
(slang) hill
knocker 
annoying or nosy person; possible reference to door-to-door salesmen and/or religious proselytizers
Krogerite 
a pejorative term for a Michigander or Michiganders

L

lala 
(colloquial) a stupid, ignorant person; a fool
Landonite
a supporter of Landonism; derives from socialist republican revolutionary Isaiah Landon
lardy 
(slang) feeling sick or ill; filthy, rotten, disgusting
lay hands 
(slang) to assault someone; to engage in a physical fight
(out in the) leaps 
the middle of nowhere; a nondescript, isolated locale where the precise location cannot be ascertained
lecture slide 
slide show
leewayer 
pushover; an indecisive or spineless person; someone who is gullible or easily deceived
lengthened stay 
a customary extension to paid vacation time given by a company or business to employees or guests, usually done during the holiday season
lich 
a highly contemptible person
like* 
(informal) widely prevalent in conversational Sierran English, used as a filler, hedge, or discourse particle.
lisee 
red envelope passed out during Lunar New Year; Cantonese/Vietnamese in origin
limp off 
(idiomatic) (1) to leave or go away, to stop bothering the listener; (2) often used as a threat to the listener for a fistfight (e.g. "Ay scrog, you wanna limp off?"); (3) a violent confrontation
litterbum 
litterbug
lob 
a pound (lb)
loiter store 
convenience store
loosen down 
(colloquial) get undressed, take off one's clothes
looser 
changing room
(keep it) loopy 
(idiomatic) stay cool or awesome; to relax, calm down (AA chill out)
Lord/Lady Superintendent/Proprietor
The viceregal representative of a PSA or a territory
love 
(colloquial) added at the end of tag questions to indicate looking for agreement, regardless of the speaker's feelings to the listener (e.g. "This weather is nice, love?", "Who doesn't like to go out to the movies, love?")
luma 
star
lunchery 
a small cafeteria
lunge at me 
(colloquial) try me; to give one a chance

M

maca 
stupid, bad
marine layer 
(colloquial) any fog that forms overnight which generally dissipates by noon; reference to the local weather phenomenon around the coastal parts of Sierra; frequently associated with June gloom and can synonymously refer to any fog or smog.
mentalize 
visualize (mentalization is a derivative variation of visualization)
milton 
(colloquial) bread with embedded toppings such as oats or nuts, typically in the crust
milky 
milk bar (AA dairy bar, NZ dairy)
minis 
(colloquial) shoes
mint balm 
(colloquial) deodorant, antiperspirant
mint spray 
air freshener
minute 
an approximate, subjective measure of distance based on traveling time in minutes (e.g. "Riverside is about 55 minutes away from Porciúncula without traffic."); hour may be used in the same fashion
mobbed out 
(slang) ugly, hideous in appearance
mod 
(colloquial) a police officer or member of law enforcement, contraction of moderator
moodge 
an ugly, unattractive woman
momo 
(colloquial) young child
mono 
good, great, excellent; used often enthusiastically (e.g. "I just passed my driving test." – "Really? Mono!")
moonman 
(slang) a member of a white nationalist or supremacist group (such as the Imperial Knights)
mooser 
hair gel
mopper 
(colloquial) a slightly pejorative term used for a working-class immigrant who has not assimilated
mop up 
(slang) to engage in oral sex; mop-upper or mop up mama are derivatives and mean a prostitute)
motley 
(slang) a lot (e.g. "That's a motley load of clothes.")
morning mirror 
a large, rotatable mirror usually kept in a bedroom
mural plate 
a decoratively themed dishware; fine china
mutt 
a gullible, foolish person

N

nackrack 
laundry basket
nailed 
(slang) to be scratched by or to scratch with the fingernails, often from a violent confrontation
nanner 
(informal) a crazy or insane person; often violent or destructive
nefcy 
a fan of cartoons
NIC 
(pronounced "nick") National Identification Card (alternatively spelled "nicky" or "nickie")
nicked 
(informal) identified, verified; confirmed legitimate (e.g. "She's nicked so don't you worry about her.")
niff 
(informal) stupid, incompetent; inconsequential
nigel 
(informal) a man (e.g. "Tell that nigel over there to come over.")
night delight 
street food, reference to the food sold at Sierran night markets
nightswatch 
security guard
nilly 
none; empty, devoid of susbstance
ninny 
(slang) an effeminate male; a male homosexual. Use may be considered offensive.
nom 
(informal) a violent, young troublemaker; a worthless person (similar to hooligan or punk). Korean in origin
nuna 
(informal) a girl or a young woman

O

oftenly 
often
oilface 
ugly, unsightly person; dirty, unhygienic person
Okie 
(offensive) a pejorative term for a Brazorian or Brazorians, especially those from Oklahoma; a poor white Anglo-American who is not Sierran
Olly trolley 
a small bus; charter bus
op doc 
(informal) optometrist
opinionist 
therapist; consultant, counselor
oxhorn 
handle, lever
oyster 
(slang) a foreign tourist, actual or perceived

P

panda parka 
(colloquial) suit-and-tie dress
paner 
window-cleaner
parachute baby 
the child of a perceived illegal immigrant, often born in Sierra due to the parent(s)' express desire to exploit Sierra's jus solis citizenship rights to obtain naturalization by association; so-named due to immigrants arriving mostly by plane during the 1990s, though not necessarily through parachutes (AA anchor baby)
paratripe 
imitation meat prepared specifically for vegetarians and vegans
parked inspection 
traffic stop made by law enforcement
parm 
(colloquial) wonderful, great (e.g. "Who likes black licorice? What about wasabi nuts? Now that's parm!")
pastoral 
a special trip to a farm or agricultural center students undergo during the summer, especially prominent among Styxer schoolchildren
pelican 
a seasonal traveler or temporary resident who spends part of the year (usually summers) in a resort town or gated community
pesto 
(slang) pesticide; poison; danger
petting galley 
petting zoo
picker 
(colloquial) a scab; skin abrasion; minor body wound (e.g. "Stop touching that picker.")
pine 
(colloquial) (v.) to scam, to trick or defraud; (n.) a fraud, a con
pinkman 
(colloquial) detective; member of law enforcement, specifically, those part of a federal law enforcement agency
pleader 
(slang) snitch, tattle-teller; a gang member who willingly provides incriminating testimony or evidence against fellow members to legal authorities
poofer 
feather duster
Porcy/Porcie/Porky/Porcupine 
(informal) Porciúncula
presidio 
a large residential house built in Spanish colonial or revival style. Spanish in origin
pruner 
hedge trimmer
PSA 
Provinces, State, Area; "PSALT" is PSA + Locality (i.e. counties, parishes), Territories
puca (puka) 
an unmarked police vehicle or a plain clothes/undercover officer. Irish in origin.
pusha 
crazy, insane; an eccentric or unusual person
pupper 
(informal) child, kid

Q

quint 
(informal) fifth
quipper 
clown, fool

R

racker 
crazy, insane; a mentally unstable person; used in shock or disbelief as in "Are you off your rackers?"
rack shop 
small retail or department store that sells discounted clothing
raiser 
mechanically liftable ladder attached to a service vehicle such as a firetruck
red rider 
dangerous, reckless person; daredevil; bold, assertive person. Originate from the term used for drivers who ran a red light
retractive payment 
cancellation fee
(got the) red marker 
(informal) death; to die (e.g. "Yesterday, a young driver got the red marker in an accident.")
refrain 
generic term for any narcotic; as a verb it means to take such narcotics (e.g. "He refrains a lot" or "The police found refrain in her car")
reformist 
an ex-convict; a parolee
relapse 
(slightly offensive) drug addict; worthless person
ripper 
(offensive) a masturbator (AA jerk-off, UK wanker)
rogger 
a letter that instills a sense of anxiety, origin unknown (e.g. "I got a rogger this morning that ended up being a damn ad")
ronin 
loner, social outcast; beggar, homeless person (AA hobo). Japanese in origin.
rootering 
(vulgar) to engage in sexual intercourse, or to suggest it
Rosie 
(affectionately) a young, beautiful woman; a female friend or comrade
roundelman 
a member of the Sierran Royal Air Force; a member of any air force
runner 
(informal) clumsy, awkward person; someone who is socially uncouth and unaware of social expectations; taken from nose run)

S

scrog 
(informal) man, fellow, guy; less endearing than bro
specky 
(colloquial, offensive) a pejorative term for a mentally ill person (retarded); a stupid person or someone who is slow to learn; word derives from the term special education
spicy 
(informal) intense, extreme, edgy (e.g. "That was a spicy horror movie.")
suncatcher 
an often derogatory term directed towards Democratic-Republican officials who appeal mostly to urban and non-white voters

T

tendie 
(informal) money; contracted form of tender as in legal tender; becomes tendies in the plural form (AA buck; UK quid)
trigger(ed) 
(informal) to be irrationally angered (e.g. "He got really triggered by that." )

U

V

W

washery 
self-service laundry (AA laundromat, UK launderette)
whisper head 
someone who experiences ASMR

X

Y

Z

Colloquial phrases

See also

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